A very important part of development is gaining the ability to communicate effectively. Part of this can be taught, but the other part comes from experience.

Sometimes Communication will differ from team to team. I have learned that in order to onboard properly, you need to quickly learn and adapt to teams.

In the NYU, my hardest challenge was a combination of being remote and unclear team roles. For many questions, there can be a lot of “name would know better”. This was the main learning curve. Knowing which type of question goes to which person can make all the difference in the world.

The other part I began learning was proper and professional talk. I previously came from a team in which bluntness was the best method of communication. This is not true for most teams. In some sense, you need to tip-toe, in another sense you need to simply be polite. I started to think of the team as a client, rather than my team and this helped dramatically. This is something I have began to apply to all teams, in a sense.

Even though I consider them my team rather than my client at Rietta Inc., NYU has helped me grow away from my old bad habits of “bluntness is key”.

The point that I’m trying to make is that as you grow and work with a multitude of different teams and team types, you will begin to learn that each team differs, but you will begin to find similarities amongst some teams, and you’ll be able to group teams into thier respective types and know how to onboard in a more and more timely manner.